Measures / Conversions

This list is not exhaustive for all of your cooking needs, but it should help you with trying to work with U.S. measurements.  Cooking Measurements Conversion, an on-line resource, will also assist you to convert recipes between metric and imperial measurements.
 
Basic Dry Measures (U.S.)

a pinch = 1/8 teaspoon (tsp.)
1 Tablespoon (Tbsp.) = 3 teaspoons (tsp.) 
1/4 cup (c.) = 3 Tablespoons (Tbsp.) 
1/3 cup (c.) = 5 1/3 Tablespoons (Tbsp.) 
1/2 cup (c.) = 8 Tablespoons (Tbsp.)
1 cup (c.) = 16 Tablespoons (Tbsp.) 
 
Basic Wet Measures (U.S.)

1 gallon = 4 quarts (qt.)
1 gallon = 8 pints (pt.)
1 gallon = 16 cups (c.)
1 gallon = 128 fluid ounces (fl oz.)
 
1 quart (qt.) = 2 pints (pt.)
1 quart (qt.) = 4 cups (c.)
1 quart (qt.) = 32 fluid ounces (fl oz.)
 
1 pint (pt.) = 2 cups (c.)
1 pint (pt.) = 16 fluid ounces (fl oz.)
 
1 cup (c.) = 8 fluid ounces (fl oz.)

Oven Temperatures
  
Fahrenheit (F)      Centigrade (C)      Gas Mark
225 degrees        110 degrees         1/4
250 degrees        130 degrees         1/2             
275 degrees        140 degrees         1
300 degrees        150 degrees         2
325 degrees        170 degrees         3
350 degrees        180 degrees         4
375 degrees        190 degrees         5
400 degrees        200 degrees         6
425 degrees        220 degrees         7
450 degrees        230 degrees         8
475 degrees        240 degrees         9
  
Other non-standard measures

Bushel = 4 pecks (8 gallons or 32 quarts, depending upon commodity)
Dash = 1/8 teaspoon
Dollop = approximately 2 teaspoons to 1 Tablespoon
Glug = approximately 2 teaspoons to 1 Tablespoon
Knob of butter = approximately 2 teaspoons to 1 Tablespoon
Pat of butter = about 1 teaspoon
Peck = 2 gallons, 8 quarts, 1/4 of a bushel
Smidge(n) = a little bit 
Splash = 1/2 teaspoon
Sprinkle = 1/8 teaspoon
Tad = a little more than you did before

  
U.S.-UK Lexicon

In my Kitchen Witch Tips, which appear at the bottom of several recipes, I've often noted some "translations" for cooking terms that I've used. Having lived in a few different countries, my recipes come from various sources and inspirations. As two countries separated by a common language (A fact noted by Oscar Wilde and George Bernard Shaw - yes, I know that this is not an exact quote by either of them.), most of my interpretations are from English to American.

Cookware in the U.S. is often sold using both imperial and metric. If you do use international recipes and cookbooks, it is helpful to keep these on hand and also to invest in a kitchen scale that weights in both pounds and kilos.


Cilantro = Coriander (fresh)
Eggplant = Aubergine
Zucchini = Courgette
Superfine sugar = Caster sugar
Confectioners' sugar = Icing sugar
Heavy whipping cream = Double cream
Light whipping cream = Single cream
Light brown sugar = Light Muscavado sugar
Dark brown sugar = Dark Muscavado sugar

Bread Roll/Sandwich Roll = Bap
Ground Beef = Mince 
Ground [Meat] = Minced [Meat]
Tuna Salad = Tuna Mayonnaise
Egg Salad = Egg Mayonnaise
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